Aims and Scope

Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health is an open access online journal, which publishes Research articles, Reviews/Mini-reviews, Letters in all areas of clinical practice and epidemiology in mental health covering the following topics:


Clinical and epidemiological research in psychiatry and mental health; diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of mental health conditions; frequencies and determinants of mental health conditions in the community and the populations at risk; research and economic aspects of psychiatry, with special attention given to manuscripts presenting new results and methods in the area; and clinical epidemiologic investigation of pharmaceutical agents.


Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health, a peer reviewed journal, aims to provide the most complete and reliable source of information on current developments in the field. The emphasis is on publishing quality articles rapidly and freely available worldwide.


Recent Articles

Fear of COVID-19 among Peruvian People Living in Disadvantaged Communities: A Cross-Sectional Study

Carlos Sotomayor-Beltran, Hernan Matta-Solis, Rosa Perez-Siguas, Eduardo Matta-Solis, Lourdes Matta-Zamudio

Background:

The COVID-19 crisis is fuelling a state of fear among the human population at global level. Especially, those living in informal settlements and slums worldwide have been profoundly impacted by this pandemic. Individuals living in these places are already leading underprivileged lives. Thus, the economic and mental health problems caused by the COVID-19 crisis have further exacerbated their living standards, which has resulted, for instance, in tragedies such as suicides.

Objective:

In this study, we have sought to identify those individuals most at risk of displaying high levels of fear of COVID-19 in an informal settlement located in the capital city of Peru.

Methods:

A questionnaire was administered to 449 inhabitants living in the Carmen Alto informal settlement. The questionnaire was made up of two parts: the first one inquired about demographic data and the second part consisted of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale.

Results:

The demographic variables of age, gender, marital status, educational level, occupation, whether a relative from the household was infected with COVID-19, and whether one of them died of this showed significant differences. It could be observed as well that the groups of females, stable workers, unemployed and those having completed a workforce education are at higher odds of displaying high levels of fear of COVID-19. As expected, the groups that had either a relative infected with COVID-19 or a relative death by this had the highest levels of fear towards the virus.

Conclusion:

The female participants are more likely to display higher levels of fear of COVID-19 due to the terrible effect that unfavorable events have on them. In the cases of the unemployed and stable workers, their proneness to show high levels of fear towards the virus is because they have lost their incomes, due to the loss of their jobs, and because of fear of infection, respectively. Hence, we hope that this work serves Peruvian (and other) health authorities to develop strategies that help individuals living in informal settlements and are in urgent need of mitigating mental health problems.


April 16, 2021
READ MORE

Editor's Choice

Health Related Quality of Life in Patients with Onco-hematological Diseases

Giorgio La Nasa, Giovanni Caocci, Emanuela Morelli, Elena Massa, Antonio Farci, Laura Deiana, Elisa Pintus, Mario Scartozzi, Federica Sancassiani

Background:

HRQoL is generally conceptualized as a broad multidimensional construct that refers to patients' perceptions of the impact of disease and its treatment on their physical, psychological, and social functioning and well-being. Little is known in patients with onco-hematological cancer in comparison with the general population and other chronic diseases.

Objective:

We assessed HRQoL in patients diagnosed with haematological cancers in comparison with the general population and other chronic diseases.

Methods:

The questionnaire Short Form (SF)-12 was administered to 62 patients with onco-hematological disease and results were compared with 702 controls (184 healthy people, 37 Major Depression, 201 Multiple Sclerosis; 23 Wilson disease; 46 Carotidal Atherosclerosis; 60 Celiac disease; 151 solid tumours).

Results:

HRQoL in patients diagnosed with a haematological cancer was significantly worse in comparison with the general population (F= 43.853, p <0.00001) but similar when compared with solid tumour and other chronic diseases such as Major Depression and Carotid Atherosclerosis. In addition, HRQoL in patients diagnosed with a haematological cancer was significantly higher than that due to Celiac disease (p <0.00001) and Wilson's disease (p= 0.02), and lower than that due to Multiple Sclerosis (p= 0.032).

Conclusion:

This study confirmed that haematological cancers negatively affects overall HRQoL. The results showed an impact of haematological cancers on HRQoL that is similar to what found in patients with solid tumors, Major Depression and Carotid Atherosclerosis. Current successful therapeutic strategy achieved in the treatment of haematological cancers not only positively impact on survival rate but also could improve the overall HRQoL.


July 30, 2020
READ MORE

Quick Links

Indexing Agencies

READ MORE